The Good Old Days

I’ve blogged before about how SMM is a way for companies to reconnect with consumers after years of distancing themselves from their customer base. Well, as you’ve probably heard, one of the biggest corporations on the planet is kicking social media marketing’s tires.

MyStarbucksIdea.com recently debuted (to mixed results) to give Starbucks fiends a place to kvetch about the java giant. As it turns out, they want to kvetch in person (sorry – registration required).

From the Advertising Age article linked to above:

“The most popular idea on the site — by a 9,000-vote margin, with about 60,000 votes — is for Starbucks to promote “conversation” at its coffeehouses.

‘One way of doing this would be to use the power of media and wireless new media in particular to foster a sense of conversation about the arts, current events, etc.,” wrote user Conniemx. “In other words, to stimulate Starbucks patrons that wish to interact as part of a 21st-century ‘cafe society’ such as they have in Europe traditionally — people gathering together to discuss the arts, world events and culture.’”

Companies that want to partake in social media marketing are obviously on the right target, because it seems that consumers are yearning for the good old days, too. Yeah, it still seems a little artificial, but who cares? People are anxious to reconnect with each other after communication through this here internet and they have generally expressed a distrust with marketers. I’m glad marketers are starting to listen, even if it takes them a little while to get it right (an “online suggestion box”? ouch!).

Especially when we may-or-may-not-be-but-most-likely-are teetering on the brink of recession, people have to trust a brand before they’ll invest in it. SMM is the only way to nab these spenders.


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This entry was posted on Tuesday, April 22nd, 2008 at 9:13 am and is filed under Internet, Social Media. You can follow any responses to this entry through the RSS 2.0 feed. Both comments and pings are currently closed.

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